FAQ

Why is it called BASEWORKS?

The word “BASEWORKS” refers to setting up foundation.

Foundation could be understood both as “structural foundation,” supporting the human body (developing and conditioning the muscle/connective tissue and mobility of the joints), and in a broader sense — deep foundations in learning. 

By practicing BASEWORKS students learn intuitively and experientially understand the mechanics of movement,  and learn to be more sensitive to the present condition and evolution of their mental and physiological states. This often leads to shifts in perception and new realisations on personal growth. So in a philosophical sense, BASEWORKS PRACTICE creates the base/support necessary for interpersonal transformation.


BASEWORKS PRACTICE vs Yoga,
What’s the difference?

Although a lot of modern yoga and movement systems are of real benefit to many people, there’s often a lack of consistency between methodologies, and or even within the same methodology — from class to class, and from teacher to teacher. This might initially be great for some people who’s primary goals are for recreation and or stress relief and or for those with extensive experience in movement. However, when it comes to building a physical foundation, going to overly diverse classes makes it difficult for many, especially for beginners. 

After years practicing and teaching different styles of yoga, and continuing with his passion for functional movement, athletics, and mindfulness practices, Patrick Oancia developed BASEWORKS PRACTICE as a system that has clear steps in building proficiency and consistency in teaching. BASEWORKS PRACTICE structure and teaching methodology are optimised for fast progress in developing physical foundations and growing of introspection that becomes a basis for understanding logic, quality and mechanics of movement. The result leads to the deeper personal inquiry directly associated with optimised learning, mindfulness and relaxation. 
 
Note: Although BASEWORKS PRACTICE is not considered a yoga and or fitness exclusive movement system, because of its influences from yoga in combination with clearly defined principles in science and biomechanics, the system can offer extremely solid foundations for any type of yoga or movement practitioner to enhance, condition and or add to their already established practice.


DEEP FOUNDATIONAL PRACTICE —
What does it mean?

In learning theories, knowledge of a subject can be shallow or deep. Deep knowledge can be difficult to achieve, similar to that of learning a new language or an academic subject. When it comes to movement, the knowledge is not symbolic. It is somatic. Some somatic knowledge requires performing daily tasks. For example, how to open the door, or how to type on a keyboard. But the requirements for daily movement for many people are very limited, and unless a person has a purpose or drive or something or someone guiding them, he or she might never even realise that they are not using their bodies in an efficient way. This often results in health problems, depression, dissatisfaction with life, and the sense of not being in control.

When it comes to the fitness and well-being industries, the media/peer pressure usually encourage people to move in order to:

1) lose weight
2) become more sexually appealing
3) be "fit" because it’s a trend

Although fields of research and application such as biomechanics and positive psychology are gradually gaining popularity, still very few people are aware of how integral movement is to our well-being and how important the quality and variety of movement is for health, self-awareness and autonomy.

When we say that BASEWORKS PRACTICE is a “deep foundational practice,” it means we have students go through a physical practice that develops their bodies in such way that they become more aware of their physical limitations and abilities and logic and physics of movement. So in BASEWORKS PRACTICE the intended result is to understand the value of diverse and functional movement for enhanced well-being and autonomy.